Babylon A.D. Review from top paper writing service

Diesel fails to establish any sort of connection to the audience, so much so that at times we want him to fail, if only in hopes to spice up his extremely bland mission. The girl in question, the damsel in distress if you will, is Aurora, a very young (and strangely pretty) woman with either a very advanced form of dementia, or maybe just crazy. It’s partially explained that she has some sort of mental powers, the ability to operate a decades-old Russian submarine for example, but we never get a full story on this and it comes across as more of an annoying, naïve little girl than a supernatural vixen.

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The third act plays very much like any one of the Saw sequels: it’s the last 20 minutes where we are revealed how everything happened in long, sprawling monologs set to quick-cut flashbacks. And much like the Saw sequels, none of this makes any sense – secondary characters do idiotic things for little or no reason, some main characters die, followed by an ending scene that completely destroys any faith one had in the last 80 minutes. Characters are introduced in the third act simply to attempt to make sense of all that has happened, some main characters are dropped because they have served their purpose, and one character that has only been seen or mentioned in snippets throughout the film turns out to be someone extremely important to the finale.

Filmmaker Mathieu Kassovitz recently came out to the Internet to try to explain that this atrocity is due to studio interference, and not to a sub-par script and terrible performances.  If anything, the apparent Fox meddling helps the movie a bit – the presumably forced action sequences shortly pull you back into the story, but it’s not long before the flaws of Kassovitz’s screenplay comes roaring back to life. But when a movie is in such a state that the director publicly denounces it, you know you’re in for an extremely forgettable, and laughingly bad, motion picture event. If nothing else, Babylon A.D.  essay delivers on that front.